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Corsair Distillery: Tennessee whiskey but not as you know it

 

Just the term “Tennessee whiskey” conjures up images of the Jack’s and George’s of the whiskey world. There’s even been songs written about it. But what if there was more to the story? 

Enter Corsair Distillery.

Founded in 2008, in Kentucky no less, Corsair became Tennessee’s first legal craft distillery to open since Prohibition when it made its move to Nashville in 2010. Since then, it has racked up more than 800 national and international awards for its forward thinking line up of whiskey, rye and other unusual small batch spirits. 

Corsair Distillery still

They make everything in-house using a pre-Prohibition era still and have their own malt barn on the outskirts of town. Based in Marathon Village, an old car factory close to downtown Nashville, the character and personality of the space reflects their whiskey. 

“Sometimes I wonder how our still is functioning but I really do think it’s the secret to our success,” Lorna Conrad, Corsair's head distiller joked with us. “It’s been around forever and we’ve been making whiskey in it forever. I truly believe it just makes a really amazing product.” 

They strive to put “Nashville in a bottle,” Corsair’s co-owner Darek Bell added. Darek began as a home brewer crafting beer, wine, sake, kombucha and just about anything in between. His wife encouraged him to go legit and open up a distillery and follow his passion. 

“We have won a lot of awards and that is one of the things we are well known for,” Darek said. 

The two bottles being featured in our upcoming box really reflect the work Corsair has been recognized for over the past decade. 

“We really appreciate RackHouse Whiskey Club coming out here because there are so many people who have had the chance to try craft spirits from all over the place or from not where they live,” Darek told us. “People think of Tennessee and people think of a standard Tennessee whiskey, I think there’s a lot more to Tennessee craft distilling than your standard typical Tennessee whiskey.”

RackHouse Whiskey Club features Corsair Distillery

What’s in the box

Corsair Triple Smoke

Whisky Advocate’s Artisan Whiskey of the Year — it’s the whiskey that put Corsair on the map. They use three individually smoked malts (cherrywood from Wisconsin, beechwood from Germany, and peat from Scotland) to craft this deep and complex whiskey. Using three distinct smokes provides consistent and balanced smoke from nose to the pallet and throughout the finish.

Awards

∞ 93 points - Beverage Testing Institute

∞ 2018 American Single Malt of the Year, Wizards of Whisky

∞ Gold, 2018 Wizards of Whisky

∞ Gold, 2017 Global Spirits Masters

∞ Gold, 2017 New York Spirits Competition

∞ Gold, 2017 Whiskey International

∞ Gold, 2017 American Craft Spirits Association

∞ Gold, 2016 American Craft Spirits Association

∞ Editor’s Choice, 2015 Whiskey Magazine

∞ Gold, 2014 International Review of Spirits Awards

∞ Double Gold, 2014 San Francisco World Spirits Competition

Corsair Dark Rye

61% Malted rye, 4% malted chocolate rye, and 35% malted barley make up the grain bill of this rich, delicious whiskey. Unlike many other rye whiskeys, Corsair doesn’t use corn to up its grain bill, choosing instead malted barley which means Corsair Dark Rye is technically both a rye whiskey and a malt whiskey. This produces an exceptionally smooth rye whiskey.

Awards

∞ 91 points - Beverage Testing Institute

∞ Silver, 2018 Wizards of Whiskey

∞ Silver, 2018 American Distilling Institute

∞ Silver, 2017 Berlin International Spirits Competition

∞ Bronze, 2017 American Craft Spirits Association

∞ Gold, 2015 American Craft Spirits Association

∞ Silver, 2014 American Craft Spirits Association

∞ Silver, 2014 Wizards of Whisky

∞ Gold, 2014 BTI Spirits Competition

∞ Silver, 2012 American Distillers Institute Awards

Sign up to RackHouse Whiskey Club by Dec. 10 to try Corsair Distillery whiskey!

Corsair Distillery RackHouse Whiskey Club

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